Paisley or Paisley pattern is a term in English for a design using the buta or boteh, a droplet-shaped vegetable motif of Persian origin. Such designs became very popular in the West in the 18th and 19th centuries.

Resembling a twisted teardrop, the fig-shaped paisley is of Persian origin, but its western name derives from the town of Paisley, in West Scotland, a centre for textiles where paisley designs were produced.

Imports from the East India Company in the first half of the 17th century made paisley and other Indian patterns popular, and the Company was unable to import enough to meet the demand. 

Local manufacturers in Marseilles began to mass-produce the patterns via early textile printing processes at 1640. England, circa 1670, and Holland, in 1678, soon followed. This, in turn, provided Europe's weavers with more competition than they could bear, and the production and import of printed paisley was forbidden in France by royal decree from 1686 to 1759. However, enforcement near the end of that period was lax, and France had its own printed textile manufacturing industry in place as early at 1746 in some locales. Paisley was not the only design produced by French textile printers; the demand for paisley which created the industry there also made possible production of native patterns such as toile de Jouy.

In the 19th century European production of paisley increased, particularly in the Scottish town from which the pattern takes its modern name. 

Source: wikipedia

The paisley patterns is very common in menswear: neckties, shirts, pocket squares and also shoes.


My new design: a wrap bracelet made from cotton and paisley silk fabric.
Available on my Etsy shop


  1. Love Paisley, had no idea of its history!

  2. Very pretty items, although I am not a paisley fan... I get 80's flashbacks. :0

  3. thanks for the historic background! didn't know about it.

  4. good to know the history of Paisley!


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